Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Central Park in the Dark

[Many is the time I've borrowed hawk and owl photos from Bruce Yolton's excellent blog -- httpt://www.urbanhawks.blogs.com . Now, to avoid having to blow my own trumpet too conspicuously, I'm copying his entire post of today.

Thanks, Bruce!

Marie Winn's Central Park In The Dark On Sale Today! - June 24, 2008

Marie Winn's Central Park in the Dark is on sale today. Congratulations to Marie, whose new book is getting excellent reviews. If you enjoyed Red-tails in Love, you're sure to enjoy this new book.


I'm also excited that book is on sale for personal reasons. The jacket photographs are mine and I'm included as a character in a number of chapters.

The book is a fun, easy read and is available online at a number of online resellers including:
Barnes & Noble
or your local bookstore

Don't just take my work for it. Here is some early praise for the book:

"New York City never sleeps, as Marie Winn proves in this delightful blend of natural history and human obsession. With her usual grace and humor, Winn weaves stories of tiny owls, exotic moths - even slug sex - into a captivating tapestry depicting the nocturnal wonders of America's most famous park." —Scott Weidensaul, author of "Of a Feather" and "Living on the Wind"

"How great is New York? Right in the middle of all that finance and culture and diplomacy, there’s a great reservoir of wildness—and people crazy-wonderful enough to explore it day and night. Marie Winn’s account will make you want to grab your headlamp and head for the park, wherever you live." —Bill McKibben, author of The Bill McKibben Reader: Pieces from an Active Life

"Marie Winn’s new book is another gem. You pick it up and immediately have fun, learning a lot as you read about what goes on at night in the city." —Bernd Heinrich, author of Winter World: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival

"Marie Winn lights up Central Park at night with wit, intelligence and a warm humanity that makes this book a love song to the natural world, an elegy for a lost friend, and an invitation to the unknown reader to follow her into the inviting dark." —Jonathan Rosen, author of The Life of the Skies: Birding at the End of Nature